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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 153 (some duplicates have been removed)
had a good discussion today about how we can build on the agreement, and i said how britain will support this, investing in projects to build the key tray corridors and simplify and speed up border crossings. as the president has said, we also had important discussions on developments in the middle east, in north africa, and in zimbabwe. we share the same strategic vision. we believe people's legitimate aspirations for a job and a voice must be met with reform and openness, not with repression and violence. on libya, i thanked president zuma for south africa's support in securing united nations security resolution 1970 and 1973 and voice leadership in the african union on this vital issue. now, it is no secret that we have disagreed on some aspects of how to respond to violence in libya, but we are agreed on the immediate imperative that all sides must take every effort to avoid the loss of civilian life. we agree on the process needed that the only safe and peaceful solution lies through a political transition, led and owned by the libyan people and backed by the united nat
not have any words. she is sad. >> what they want is for colonel gaddafi to stand trial. this week, britain shifted its position. they said that colonel gaddafi must leave power, he could stay on in the country if that is what the people want. look at what happened here. look at the scale of destruction. hundreds of people died in the battle for misrata and they cannot forget or forgive. what they want is justice. however much britain frowns on america on a quick settlement, it is difficult to imagine a solution that is acceptable for the government in tripoli and the people of misrata. the city is still under attack. a petrol depot struck by rockets this week, this is hardly conducive for peace talks. the truth is that misrata remains on a war footing, hundreds of its men are dug-in, stretching for miles along the latest from lines. they are a little bit more organized, better equipped, even if they cannot always see who they are firing at. they plan to go all the way to tripoli. progress has been slower than britain and the west hoped-for. the fighting, not talking, that is the concentrat
that country and keep britain and britain safe from another 9/11 or 7/7. thousands more including many civilians have risked their lives and hundreds have been injured fighting for the security of our nation. they were called to an international coalition involving 48 countries with a specific you and mandate working at the invitation of a democratically elected government. though there have been many difficult times we should be clear about what has been achieved. in 2009 my predecessor, the prime minister told this house that some three quarters of this serious terrorist plots against britain linked afghanistan and pakistan. we must always be on guard. i am advised this figure is significantly reduced. international forces have been bearing down on al qaeda and the taliban in pakistan and afghanistan. osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda is significantly weakened. in afghanistan british and international forces have driven al qaeda from its bases and while it is too early to tell for certain initial evidence suggests we halted the momentum of the taliban insurgency in its hea
him. we'll bring you more information when we have it. >>> britain's former prime minister gordon brown is the latest victim of phone hacking. the sun and sunday times improperly obtained personal information like bank and medical records on his family. two senior police officers will be grilled by a committee of mps why they didn't investigate phone hacking claims earlier. >>> u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton has criticized syria for failing to protect embassies after pro-government demonstrators broke windows and spray painted walls. no one managed to get into the building. >>> divers are still searching for victims of a deadly boat disaster. the boat was overloaded, not licensed to carry passengers when it sank on sunday. president dmitry medvedev ordered an investigation. >>> u.s. president barack obama is meeting with lawmakers for another round of debt talks on tuesday. the debate stalled over how to slash the deficit and raise the debt ceiling before the u.s. defaults. republicans want spending cuts but democrats support tax hikes and neither side wants to compromise
range. >>> there is new fallout from britain's phone scandal that is threatening rupert murdoch's media empire. murdock is in london trying to do some damage control. >> reporter: media mogul rupert murdoch faced a mob of reporters easy met with his embattled ceo, rebecca brooks, in london. british police will question her later this week about the phone hacking cover-up that happened on her watch. cameras caught murdock reading sunday's final edition of the news of the world. the paper ended a 168-year run after news broke that journalists were hacking the phones of murder and terrorism victims for stories. >> there will have to be some kind of massive, massive clearout of the stables really. it just looks terrible. >> reporter: london's "daily mirror" tabloid is hitting murdock with more claims of corruption involving 9-11 victims. the paper quotes an ex-new york city cop saying news of the world reporters offered to pay him for phone records of the dead. the phone hacking scandal boiled over last week with a case of milly dowler, a british team murdered in 2002. her parents met with
applications for similar cases against the dutch state. >> for years, the news of the world, britain's top selling sunday tabloid and part of rupert murdoch of global media empire at news corp. has been dogged by claims of phone hacking. now the story has taken another twist. today, prime minister, david cameron, spoke of his shock over allegations that a mobile phone belonging to a young british girl murdered nine years ago was hacked into by a private detective working for the newspaper. >> for months, this scandal has been growing and growing as more and more celebrities and politicians aren't formed their phones had been hacked. but now, and much more serious allegation has shocked the country. a 13-year-old went missing in 2002. her body was found six months later. the latest claim is that the news of the world packed into her phone while she was missing and some messages may have been deleted in the process. david cameron, who is on a trip to afghanistan, made his feelings clear. >> if they are true, this is a truly dreadful act and a truly dreadful situation. what i read in the pape
and raises more and more difficult questions for the police in britain. because originally the police said they looked into the allegations and said it was just a few isolated incidents and that there wasn't any need to investigate further and that now poses the question that either there was some kind of coverup at scotland yard or they just didn't think those allegations were serious enough to warrant investigation. and as we've now seen such as the phone a murdered school girl having had her phone hacked, this has really blown up. >> it's difficult for police, but how difficult is it now for politicians like the prime minister? >> it is difficult. all recent prime ministers have tried to keep on the right side of rupert merdock and news international, because they own about 40% of the british media. so they are very powerful. but many say that now has to change and there was a sense that proops for too long there had been too much deference for titles like news of the world and david cameron is vulnerable on this, because he has links to two former editors from news of the world. one w
that. >> we have no evidence of that in norway or in britain. >> but for now, the focus in norway is on the dead and those missing. the police will release more names as the terrible process of identifying all have been lost goes on. james robbins, bbc news, oslo. >> and as norway continues to mourn, the country's justice minister has praised the security services for their response to friday's attack, but four days on, there are questions about whether the police were quick enough to get to the rampage. local residents were the first to organize the rescue. gavin hewitt has been talking to some of those involved. >> across from the island, where so many died, there are still people waiting, with young people still missing. what is emerging here is the story of those rescued and questions about the police response. the heart of this rescue is a camp site. the two launched their boat to help people swimming from the island, where a man dressed as a policeman was hunting their friends down. >> the first thing was, they do not trust us. "i cannot trust you." we have to make some comf
against the dutch state. >> for years, the news of the world, britain's top selling sunday tabloid and part of rupert murdoch of global media empire at news corp. has been dogged by claims of phone hacking. now the story has taken another twist. today, prime minister, david cameron, spoke of his shock over allegations that a mobile phone belonging to a young british girl murdered nine years ago was hacked into by a private detective working for the newspaper. >> for months, this scandal has been growing and growing as more and more celebrities and politicians aren't formed their phones had been hacked. but now, and much more serious allegation has shocked the country. a 13-year-old went missing in 2002. her body was found six months later. the latest claim is that the news of the world packed into her phone while she was missing and some messages may have been deleted in the process. david cameron, who is on a trip to afghanistan, made his feelings clear. >> if they are true, this is a truly dreadful act and a truly dreadful situation. what i read in the papers is quite, quite shoc
-cutting bill aimed at averting default today, while in britain thousands of public sector workers went on strike rallying against pension reforms. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the "newshour" tonight, we look at whether austerity measures can work to spur economic growth and help solve the european debt crisis. >> brown: then, we have a newsmaker interview with white house chief of staff bill daley about the stalled debt talks, a day after the president scolded congress. >> warner: betty ann bowser reports on a colorado hospital where medical mistakes are rare. >> one in three americans are at risk of a hospital acquired infection or will become a victim of a medical error. this hospital in denver is doing something about that. >> brown: ray suarez explores the prospect of another tech bubble. this time from social media websites. >> warner: and we get a rare view of dissent in china, following a new surge of protests by young people and labor union members. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour
of other countries and britain had to take on some of that and do it directly and do it very well. the town itself is going to be one of the first places in afghanistan to transition. is imminent already today that security is provided by afghans for afghans. having been there many times, i find that fact pretty staggering and encouraging and you should too. >> given that the raw material, high proportion of illegal drugs on britain streets starts in afghanistan at progress is being made in getting farmers to grow other things other than poppy and is the prime minister confident the afghan government will continue this work once we left? >> we are seeing progress on this. britain is invested in the wheat seed distribution project. one of the lessons of going to e country repeatedly in the last five years is if you want to doomething about poppy cultivation you can talk all you like about destroying crops. the real key is building roads because you have got to enable the afghans to get their produce toarket. if they don't have legitimate produce to get to legitimate market the drug dealers w
empire is at an all-time low in britain as new allegations emerge daily of data theft and hacking at other news court papers. >> thanks. the united states has condemned syria for refusing to protect the american and french embassies in damascus from attack by government loyalists. the u.s. state department said mobs assault of both the u.s. embassy compound and the ambassadors residents, but that no staff were injured. progress government demonstrators filled central damascus over the weekend, expressing their anger at the presence of the u.s. and french ambassadors in the city that has been the center of opposition to president al assad. member protests on the streets of syria, this time by supporters of the al assad regime. they took part in a rally against the ambassadors of the u.s. and france. they -- the show support for the democracy movement prompted an angry show from damascus. franz's foreign ministry said the crowds were well organized, while security forces did nothing to stand in the way -- france was a foreign ministry. the u.s. also condemned the day's events. >> it
economy is stable at this time because the government has taken difficult decisions to get to britain's defeat. to -- to britain's debt. and they announced they have no plans to abandoned that plan. >> to norway, and the justice minister praising the fantastic work done by police after the bombing and shooting on utoeya island. but there has been criticism to have time it took police to get to the island. it's emerged that police also overestimated the number of people who died on the island and revised the death toll from 86 to 68. eight people were also killed in the bomb attack and a number of people are still missing from the island. >> the most important thing is we are completely focused on supporting the families of those and all those affected. we have things in mace all over the country and have people in our government affected. we have missing people at utoeya. and we have many people deeply affected. we have to look after them. i'm completely open to discuss how the response to these attacks have been handled. but i would like to emphasize that the police have done a magni
for questioning and found herself under arrest. hours later, britain's top police officer, the chief of scotland yard resigned, and he acknowledges that the investigation was inadequate, and steven yates now announcing his resignation. the scandal has been growing steadily after reports that there was a hacking of an answering machine by "news of the world." tomorrow murdoch and his son james are scheduled to appear on a hearing in parliament. cnn will bring you that testimony live. dan rivers is inla london. rebekah brooks is expected to testify tomorrow, and now what are the plans in terms of questioning her tomorrow? >> reporter: well, politicians will have to be careful how they frame the questions to her. in britain, if there is a pending trial or the possibility of a pending trial, you have to be very careful what kind of news coverage is gained from that, because they don't want to prejudge the trial here. they don't want to sway a potential juror one way or the other. and this testimony from rebekah brooks will be broadcast live not only here but around the world. they have to be fairly
the celebrations. and although the blood has been pulled on britain's most scandalous newspaper, hacking continues. >> america will continue the dream with the space shuttle liftoff. >> the u.s. space program reaches the end of an era with hundreds of thousands watching on. ♪ >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. just an hour ago, the world welcomed a new nation when the republic of south sudan officially regained -- officially gained its independence. it comes after a brutal civil war and a peace deal with the south and north. celebrations are already under way, but there are huge challenges, including continued violence along the border. >> the final march 2 independence. i will never leave my land until i die, the song heard throughout the decades of war with north sudan. and now they have their land and south sudan is born. ♪ [singing] ♪ >> with a little help the reverse of the brand new national anthem. -- they rehearse the brand new national anthem. because of the war, south sudan will start out as one of the poorest nations on the planet. >> when we were ru
of the world," britain's top-selling sunday tabloid and part of rupert murdoch's global media empire, has been afflicted by claims of phone hacking. david cameron expressed his shock that the phone of a girl who was murdered years ago was hacked into by a "news of the world" correspondent. >> the scandal has been growing and growing as more and more people learned that their phones had been hacked. now, a much more serious allegation has shocked the country. 13-year-old 2 went missing -- 13-year-old milly dowler went missing. there were allegations that "news of the world" packed into her phone and that some messages might have been deleted in that act. >> if these allegations are true, this is a dreadful act, a dreadful situation. what i have read in the papers is quite shocking -- that someone could do this -- while knowing that the police were trying to find this person and find out what had happened. >> there is more pressure on the prime minister's friend, rebekah brooks, chief executive of news international in the u.k., editor at "news of the world" when milly dowler went missing. she h
for an extra 185 million pounds immediately. the international response has been mixed. britain has given 23 million pounds to somalia this year. united states has given barely half of that. germany and france are among those accused of ignoring the alarm bells. >> contributions from other countries has been dangerously inadequate. britain is setting a good lead. we expect others to contribute. there are signs others are beginning. we need that to happen rapidly and vigorously. >> money is not the only problem. the famine has taken hold in areas controlled or influenced by militant islamist group. they made it too dangerous for foreign aid groups to operate directly. they say a ban has been lifted, but the politics are competen-- complicated and aid is not getting to the right people fast enough. the familiar images of hunger and helplessness. the predictable scramble for money and access as famine bites into somalia. erson isast one p reported to have been killed in malawi in demonstrations against the government. despite an earlier court ruling banning protests, protests have continued. th
and britain decide that this is really shameful. we don't have any institutions to build defenses. we don't have any institutions to plan and run an operation. never again. so they met on the island. they came off with an agreement. when the european union was set up there always was a security pillar. it had been put aside so that they could focus on trees that affected finance and capital market and movement of people and bringing the continent closer together. but they decided to fire up the security pillar. they set up -- nato is run, by the way, by a board of directors , the north atlantic council. military committee, and then you have various other committees, but those are the key structures that run nato. and so the europeans set up a military committee, military staff. they set up a satellite center in brussels. all the sudden focus woke up in washington and said, hey, what are these europeans doing? of the going to take away what nato is doing? there are to be duplication? the u.s. with a uk set up some ground rules. no, this is all okay, but you can set up a permanent headquart
think the murdoch empire and great britain is coming down. if it leaps the atlantic to the united states, it's really big trouble. and i feel sorry for murdoch going up against the parliamentary committee because it's going to be very, very tough on him. i don't know if he had anything to do with it. but this is aucwfully high up, joe. it's reached to murdoch's son and the prime minister's office in great britain. this is going to metastasize. >> you hear all of the talk in the press about the murdoches, the murdoches, the murdoches. they don't run the company by themselves. there is a board. and at some point, they're going to tell the murdochs this type of dynasty did not work in egypt. it's not going to work in news corp. you're going to have to step down. and i suspect that you're going to see -- i agree with pat. i don't see how the murdoch family survives this. i don't see how the sons take over the empire. this keeps exploding oochlgt. >> -- exploding. >> a couple of things, the brand has been damaged irreparably already, whatever comes across the states here and the department of
moving developments today in britain as well. the murdoch phone hacking scandal has claimed its first public official. we'll have much more on that story right after this short break. to use legalzoom for important legal documents. so start your business, protect your family, launch your dreams. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. launch your dreams. discover customersl are getting five percent cashback bonus at the pump... and at many of the places their summer plans take them. it pays to switch, it pays to discover. >>> all right. the murdoch phone hacking scandal has claimed its first public official now. a short time ago, britain's top cop suddenly resigned. his resignation comes on the same day police arrested a top murd murdoch executive. atika shubert, why did the commissioner of britain's metropolitan police suddenly resign? >> well, he said basically that he had done nothing wrong but that there had been such intense scrutiny over the relationship between metropolitan police officers and "news of the world" executives that he felt it was best for him to resign, to k
phone hacking scandal in britain has claimed its first public official. just hours ago, britain's top cop suddenly resigned. his resignation comes on the same day police arrested a top murdoch executive. let's bring in cnn's atika shubert. atika, is there a connection between the resignation and the arrest of that top murdoch executive? >> well, there are basically two different strands of the same scandal. in the place of sir paul stevenson, the topmost senior police officer here in britain, he basically resigned because of increasing intense scrutiny over the relationship between the metropolitan police and "news of the world." that tabloid that was shut down because of those phone hacking allegations. and basically there was a former "news of the world" editor, neil wallace, who it turns out was paid by the metropolitan police to be a communications consultant. sir paul stevenson was taking a lot of flak for that. now, he resigned saying he feels he's done nothing wrong, his integrity is intact, he says. however, he does feel that these allegations are distracting from the metropol
it at 2.5% of the cost. this is a good investment for britain, for british taxpayers to make sure we reduce inequality in our world. >> can the prime minister explain whether he thinks that the cost of his nhs reforms set to rise even further we now know with the revelation that a new super quango is going to be created. it might be partly responsible putting at risk services at the popular school in my constituency? >> what we've actually seen since this government has taken office is more than 2,000 more doctors but 4,000 fewer managers. and we are cutting bureaucracy by a third. i know they don't like to hear it. but if we'd followed their plans and cut nhs spending, you'd see the number of doctors, the number of nurses, the number of operations going down. and just this morning, we see the figures for the number of diagnostic tests in the u.k. going up. that's because of the investment going in under this government. >> thank you, mr. speaker. will the prime minister be aware of the news this morning that portugal's debt has been downgraded to junk status. does he not agreed that
the prime minister of britain, of the uk, all the way to south africa where he is on a trip to try to drum the more business. the head of britain's largest police force has resigned. that's sir paul stevenson. commissioner of the metropolitan police stepped down as questions surrounding his relationship with editors of the "news of the world" newspaper. while stevenson maintains he had no knowledge of the extent of the activities paper he said he was resigning because "as commissioner i carry ultimate responsibility for the position we find ourselves in." his resignation comes as news international's former chief executive rebekah brooks was arrested sunday and underwent 12 hours of questioning by police. that came as a surprise she was arrested. she thought she was just going to be helping in their investigation. brooks is set to appear before a parliamentary inquiry tuesday alongside james murdock and rupert murdock. there are questions if she'll be able to testify. >> those bombings last week in india. hillary clinton had a trip planned there. she's still going ahead with that trip? >>
at home. ray suarez has our report. >> suarez: britain today added itself to a list of more than 30 countries, including the united states, now giving diplomatic recognition to the rebels' national transitional council. british foreign secretary william hague: >> the national transitional council has shown its commitment to a more open and democratic libya, something that it is working to achieve through an inclusive political process. this is in stark contrast to qaddafi whose brutality against the libyan people has stripped him of all legitimacy. >> suarez: hague also said the move paves the way for the rebels to get access to $150 million of libyan oil money held in britain. and he announced the expulsion of the few remaining envoys from colonel qaddafi's regime within three days, but they could reportedly be given more time if they choose to defect. qaddafi, meanwhile, continues to reject calls to step down and in a further act of defiance, libyan state television yesterday showed the lockerbie bomber abdelbaset al megrahi at a pro-government rally. his appearance comes nearly t
in peril britain was at the end of the 20 century. to discuss this, my colleague spoke to an economist, the author who left after taking part in protests in 1989, and a writer on risk in geopolitics. first, we take stock of how the land lies. >> the paramount fear -- the crowd is diverse the of all code come to take part in a production of a change their lives. they call it naturalization here. to you and me, that means becoming a u.s. citizen. cheesy, yes, to see one of the ceremonies is to grasp the essence of america. >> this is one of those only in america plummets. this is part of a living -- legal process. this is all wrapped into kind of a movie experience. it says, "i am honored to congratulate you on becoming a citizen of the united states. because of your determination, this great nation, is now your nation, sign, sincerely, barack obama." >> america is vexed by doubts, but that has not put them off. fresh blood is coming faster than ever before. >> the racism and everything you encounter, i don't feel that here. >> they give me so much freedom. freedom to do anything i want.
. >> that is the latest from britain, where the pressure is mounting. the f.b.i. is probing allegations that newscorp tried to hack the phone records of victims of 9/11. concerns were raised by peter king, and joining him was democrat bruce brailey, who asked the house oversight committee to act. thank you for joining us. tyou say in your letter you have concerns about allegations that hacking extended to u.s. citizens. >> we do know there are concerns about the possibility that voicemails from 9/11 victims were obtained. there is a chance u.s. citizens may have had their emails accessed by newscorp. because of the alarm about this issue, i joined peter king and louise slaughter, from new york with a strong interest in protecting those victims. they are makin gsurg sure there is no violation of u.s. law, to provide the oversight the constitution requires. >> there was a possibility of victims of this. >> this is not a fishing expedition. the chair of the homeland security committee. they would not ask the f.b.i. to investigate this. for those uof us with a sense of decency, we have to push for answer
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 153 (some duplicates have been removed)

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